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Three Tips for a More Spiritual Life

The idea of spirituality feels broad, and perhaps even a bit abstract, as there is room for many ideas within this concept. Incorporating more spirituality into our lives, or becoming “more spiritual,” can feel like a big idea at first, and we may struggle with where to begin and how to make it real for us. Essentially, this is about cultivating a connection to something bigger than ourselves, so as to come in touch with an expanded, holistic view of ourselves and our lives. Working with this intention in a simple, practical way will support a richer, more meaningful way of living that opens the door for more.

Move into sleep intentionally.

1. Begin and end your day with space for connection and reflection. Try getting up a little earlier—before the active energy of the day begins. Early morning is an optimal time for inner connection. Cherish this quiet moment of transition from sleeping to activity. As you sit comfortably, perhaps with a hot cup of tea, notice and connect to the flow of your breath to ground yourself in preparation for your daily duties. Eventually, this could also be a time for prayer or meditation. Before you move into your day, pause to acknowledge and connect to the presence of the divine within you. This is a place of quiet inner stability from which you can extend yourself out into the world. In the evening, disconnect from your devices and use the last moments before sleep to feel your breath and become open to the possibility of a deeper inner reality. Consciously release the day’s events and move into sleep intentionally so that your rest is deep and restorative.

2. Be the observer.
It’s easy to get caught up in the chaotic rhythm of our daily lives and routines. Although challenging at first, attempt to observe yourself as you move through your day. Set an intention to pause throughout the day to observe your breath, actions, interactions with others, and your inner dialogue with yourself. This is especially helpful in moments of stress or difficulty. Instead of attaching to or judging your thoughts, simply notice them. Allow your observation to extend externally as well. Find small moments of reflection in nature. Look up as you walk outside. Take time to breathe in the fresh air, rest your eyes on the colors of trees, grass, and sky—even if it’s only as you move between your car and your office. This conscious observation can begin to shift your perspective, and instead of looking at the day as something to just “get through,” you can begin to step out of the chronic state of busyness and appreciate a deeper experience of life as more interesting and enjoyable in these found moments of awareness.

3. Find Inspiration. Find a spiritual path that resonates with you and then study and follow that path with full commitment. If you find this difficult, you can cultivate the intention to find a path and then allow that space to remain open. Read uplifting texts that support your path, that increase your enthusiasm for your spiritual pursuits, and that serve as a reminder that our struggles are universal. Listen to beautiful music with a positive message. Seek out the company of like-minded people who have similar aspirations for self-awareness and expansion to cultivate connection and community. Finding inspiration in the environment around you will enrich your experience of life overall and provide encouragement to continue your spiritual pursuits.

Cultivate connection and community.

Creating space for reflection, learning to observe, and actively seeking inspiration are three ways to bring more spirituality into your daily life. At face value, they seem extremely simple, and yet each one offers opportunity for deeper exploration. Over time, these form a supportive structure for a nourishing personal experience of life that will expand and evolve.

About the Teacher

Judy Moulton

Judy Moulton is a Himalayan Institute certified and Yoga Alliance recognized E-RYT 500, an Ayurvedic Health Counselor, and Ayurvedic Yoga Therapist registered with the National Ayurvedic Medical Association (NAMA). Judy is also the director of the Himalayan Institute’s professional certification programs and an integral faculty member teaching within those programs. In addition, Judy is a member of the PureRejuv Wellness Center staff, leading ayurvedic retreats and conducting individual consultations. Having experienced the immense transformative power of yoga and ayurveda directly, she relies on her own personal practice to support her daily life and is dedicated to helping others to do the same.

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